ESSENCE Q & A v4.0

Held on March 14, 2019.

During this 90-minute session, Aaron Kite-Powell, M.S., from CDC and Wayne Loschen, M.S., from JHU-APL provided updates on the NSSP ESSENCE platform and answered the community's questions on ESSENCE functions and features.

March 21, 2019

Monitoring suicide-related events using National Syndromic Surveillance Program data

Suicide is a growing public health problem in the United States. From 2001 to 2016, ED visit rates for nonfatal self-harm, a common risk factor for suicide, increased 42%.

June 18, 2019

Use of N-grams and Term Relationship Graphs in the Syndrome Definition Development Process

The use of syndromic surveillance systems has evolved over the last decade, and increasingly includes both infectious and non- infectious topic areas. Public health agencies at the national, state, and local levels often need to rapidly develop new syndromic categories, or improve upon existing categories, to enhance their public health surveillance efforts. Documenting this development process can help support increased understanding and user acceptance of syndromic surveillance.

June 18, 2019

Use of ESSENCE APIs to Support Flexible Analysis and Reporting

The ESSENCE application supports users' interactive analysis of data by clicking through menus in a user interface (UI), and provides multiple types of user defined data visualization options, including various charts and graphs, tables of statistical alerts, table builder functionality, spatial mapping, and report generation. However, no UI supports all potential analysis and visualization requirements.

June 18, 2019

ESSENCE Q & A v3.0

Held September 13, 2018.

Aaron Kite-Powell, M.S., from CDC and Wayne Loschen, M.S., from JHU-APL were available during this 60-minute session to provide updates on the ESSENCE platform as well as tips and tricks to make it more useful for members. Attendees came prepared with questions regarding ESSENCE functions, capabilities and uses.

September 26, 2018

ESSENCE Q & A v2.0

Presented March 27, 2018.

During this 90-minute session, Aaron Kite-Powell, M.S., from CDC and Wayne Loschen, M.S., from JHU-APL provided an overview of tips and tricks in ESSENCE and answered questions from the audience regarding ESSENCE functions, capabilities and uses.

March 27, 2018

The Myths and Truths About Comparing Syndromic Data Across Sites

One of the more recent successes of NSSP has been the introduction of more robust data quality monitoring and reporting. However, despite the increased insight into data quality, there are still concerns about data sharing and comparisons across sites. For NSSP to be most effective, users need to feel confident in sharing data and making comparisons across sites.

Objective:

January 19, 2018

Tracking suspected heroin overdoses in CDC's National Syndromic Surveillance Program

Overdose deaths involving opioids (i.e., opioid pain relievers and illicit opioids such as heroin) accounted for at least 63% (N = 33,091) of overdose deaths in 2015. Overdose deaths related to illicit opioids, heroin and illicitly-manufactured fentanyl, have rapidly increased since 2010. For instance, heroin overdose deaths quadrupled from 3,036 in 2010 to 12,989 in 2015. Unfortunately, timely response to emerging trends is inhibited by time lags for national data on both overdose mortality via vital statistics (8-12 months) and morbidity via hospital discharge data (over 2 years).

January 21, 2018

Disaster Surveillance: Perspectives from Federal, State, and Local levels

In this panel, the presenters will discuss their perspective in responding to Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Hurricane Harvey made landfall on August 25th and over the course of 4 days dropped approximately 27 trillion gallons of water on Texas and Louisiana. The flooding that ensued was unprecedented and forced over 13,000 people into shelters. These individuals needed to have their basic needs -food, shelter, clothing, sanitation- met as well as their physical and mental health needs.

January 25, 2018

How do we present messy syndromic surveillance data to public health’s partners?

With increasing awareness of SyS systems, there has been a concurrent increase in demand for data from these systems – both from researchers and from the media. The opioid epidemic occurring in the United States has forced the SyS community to determine the best way to present these data in a way that makes sense while acknowledging the incompleteness and variability in how the data are collected at the hospital level and queried at the user level.

January 25, 2018

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, CDC programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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