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Spatial Scan Statistics [1] usually assume Poisson or Binomial distributed data, which is not adequate in many disease surveillance scenarios. For example, small areas distant from hospitals may exhibit a smaller number of cases than expected in those simple models. Also, underreporting may... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Multiple or irregularly shaped spatial clusters are often found in disease or syndromic surveillance maps. We develop a novel method to delineate the contours of spatial clusters, especially when there is not a clearly dominating primary cluster, through artificial neural networks. The method... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Early warning systems must not always rely on geographical proximity for modeling the spread of contagious diseases. Instead, graph structures such as airways or social networks are more adequate in those situations. Nodes, associated to cities, are linked by means of edges, which represent... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The spatial scan statistic is the usual measure of strength of a cluster [1]. Another important measure is its geometric regularity [2]. A genetic multiobjective algorithm was developed elsewhere to identify irregularly shaped clusters [3]. A search is executed aiming to maximize two objectives... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Many heuristics were developed recently to find arbitrarily shaped clusters (see  review  [1]). The most popular statistic is the spatial scan  [2]. Nevertheless, even if all cluster solutions could be known, the problem  of selecting the best cluster is ill posed. This happens because other... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Irregularly shaped cluster finders frequently end up with a solution consisting of a large zone z spreading through the map, which is merely a collection of the highest valued regions, but not a geographically sound cluster. One way to amenize this problem is to introduce penalty functions to... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Irregularly shaped spatial disease clusters occur commonly in epidemiological studies, but their geographic delineation is poorly defined. Most current spatial scan software usually displays only one of the many possible cluster solutions with different shapes, from the most compact round... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Voronoi Based Scan (VBScan)[1] is a fast method for the detection and inference of point data set space-time disease clusters. A Voronoi diagram is built for points representing population individuals (cases and controls). The number of Voronoi cells boundaries intercepted by the line... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The intrinsic variability that exists in the cases counting data for aggregated-area maps amounts to a corresponding uncertainty in the delineation of the most likely cluster found by methods based on the spatial scan statistics [3]. If this cluster turns out to be statistically significant it... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The spatial scan statistic [1] is the most used measure for cluster strenght. The evaluation of all possible subsets of regions in a large dataset is computationally infeasible. Many heuristics have appeared recently to compute approximate values that maximizes the logarithm of the likelihood... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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