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Syndromic surveillance systems often produce large numbers of detections due to excess activity (alarms) in their indicators. Few alarms are classified as alerts (public health events that may require a response). Decision-making in syndromic surveillance as to whether an alarm requires a... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Seasonal rises in respiratory illnesses are a major burden on primary care services. Public Health England (PHE), in collaboration with NHS 111, coordinate a national surveillance system based upon the daily calls received at the NHS 111 telehealth service. Daily calls are categorized according... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Whilst the sensitivity and specificity of traditional laboratory-based surveillance can be readily estimated, the situation is less clear cut for syndromic surveillance. Syndromic surveillance indicators based upon presenting symptoms, chief complaints or preliminary diagnoses are designed to... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Public Health England has developed a suite of syndromic surveillance systems, collecting data from a number of health care sources, and linking to public health action to try and improve the public health benefit of the surveillance.1 We aim to describe this national syndromic service,... Read more

Content type: Abstract

We assessed the impact of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games on syndromic surveillance systems including the incidence of syndromic indictors and total contacts with health care.

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Mass gatherings can impact on the health of the public including importation of... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Within the UK, previous syndromic surveillance studies have used statistical estimation to describe the activity of respiratory pathogens. The Emergency Department Syndromic Surveillance System (EDSSS) was initially developed in preparation of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and has... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In this webinar, the syndromic surveillance service delivered by Public Health England will be discussed. The presentation will describe the national syndromic surveillance systems used in England (general practitioners, emergency departments, telehealth call services), the routine statistical... Read more

Content type: Webinar

Syndromic surveillance is the real-time collection and interpretation of data to allow the early identification of public health threats and their impact, enabling public health action. Statistical methods are used in syndromic surveillance to identify when the activity of indicator ‘signals’... Read more

Content type: Abstract

From 1 September 2015, babies in the United Kingdom (UK) born on/after 1 July 2015 became eligible to receive the MenB vaccine, given at 2 and 4 months of age, with a booster at 12 months. Early trials found a high prevalence of fever (over 38°C) in babies given the vaccine with other routine... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance involves monitoring big health datasets to provide early warning of threats to public health. Public health authorities use statistical detection algorithms to interrogate these datasets for aberrations that are indicative of emerging threats. The algorithm currently in... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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