ESSENCE Q & A v5.0

Held on June 19, 2019.

During this 90-minute session, Aaron Kite-Powell, M.S., from CDC and Wayne Loschen, M.S., from JHU-APL provided updates on the NSSP ESSENCE platform and answered the community's questions on ESSENCE functions and features.

June 20, 2019

ESSENCE Q & A v4.0

Held on March 14, 2019.

During this 90-minute session, Aaron Kite-Powell, M.S., from CDC and Wayne Loschen, M.S., from JHU-APL provided updates on the NSSP ESSENCE platform and answered the community's questions on ESSENCE functions and features.

March 21, 2019

Rough Guide to Set up Data Feed for Poison Center Data in Your State

The Oregon ESSENCE team has developed a guide for other states to use to set up a web service link to their poison center and extract its data into ESSENCE. It contains advice based on Oregon’s experience in developing its link with its poison center and NDPS, a plug-&-play (almost) Rhapsody configuration file (and instructions) to install, and data dictionaries provided by NPDS.

The publication date is February 1, 2019.

January 31, 2019

What Can You Really Do with 35,000 Statistical Alerts a Week Anyways?

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program's (NSSP) instance of ESSENCE* in the BioSense Platform generates about 35,000 statistical alerts each week. Local ESSENCE instances can generate as many as 5,000 statistical alerts each week. While some states have well-coordinated processes for delegating data and statistical alerts to local public health jurisdictions for review, many do not have adequate resources. By design, statistical alerts should indicate potential clusters that warrant a syndromic surveillance practitioner's time and focus.

June 18, 2019

Analytic Fusion for Essential Indicators of the Opioid Epidemic

Unlike other health threats of recent concern for which widespread mortality was hypothetical, the high fatality burden of opioid overdose crisis is present, steadily growing, and affecting young and old, rural and urban, military and civilian subpopulations. While the background of many public health monitors is mainly infectious disease surveillance, these epidemiologists seek to collaborate with behavioral health and injury prevention programs and with law enforcement and emergency medical services to combat the opioid crisis.

June 18, 2019

Approach to Onboarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Data Into a Syndromic Surveillance System

Syndromic surveillance has become an integral component of public health surveillance efforts within the state of Florida. The near real-time nature of these data are critical during events such as the Zika virus outbreak in Florida in 2016 and in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in 2017. Additionally, syndromic surveillance data are utilized to support daily reportable disease detection and other surveillance efforts.

June 18, 2019

Building Electronic Disease Surveillance Capacity in the Peruvian Navy with SAGES

In the past 15 years, public health surveillance has undergone a revolution driven by advances in information technology (IT) with vast improvements in the collection, analysis, visualization, and reporting of health data. Mobile technologies and open source software have played a key role in advancing surveillance techniques, particularly in resource-limited settings. Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) is an internationally recognized leader in the area of electronic disease surveillance.

June 18, 2019

Enhancing Drug Overdose Alerts with Spatial Visualization

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana, and the gap continues to widen1. While federal funding opportunities are available for states, it often takes years for best practices to be developed, shared, and published. Similarly, local health departments (LHDs) may experience lengthy delays to receive finalized county health statistics.

June 18, 2019

Enhancing TX SyS by integrating EMS and Poison Data for Opioid Overdose Surveillance

In recent years, the number of deaths from illicit and prescription opioids has increased significantly resulting in a national and local public health crisis. According to the Texas Center for Health Statistics, there were 1340 opioid related deaths in 2015.1 In 2005, by comparison, there were 913 opioid related deaths. Syndromic surveillance can be used to monitor overdose trends in near real-time and provide much needed information to public health officials.

June 18, 2019

ESSENCE Features for 2019

The ESSENCE system is a community-driven disease surveillance system. Installed in over 25 jurisdictions across the US, the system is built on a single codebase that is shared across all instances. While each individual location can customize many of the settings, data sources, and configurations, the underlying code and functionality is shared. This means that when one jurisdiction works with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to create a new feature, it is available to all sites.

June 18, 2019

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Contact Us

National Syndromic
Surveillance Program

Email:nssp@cdc.gov

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among states and public health jurisdictions that contribute data to the BioSense Platform, public health practitioners who use local syndromic surveillance systems, Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs, other federal agencies, partner organizations, hospitals, healthcare professionals, and academic institutions.

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