A general overview of the French syndromic surveillance system SurSaUD

After the major impact of the 2003 heat wave, France needed a reactive, permanent and national surveillance system enabling to detect and to follow-up various public health events all over the territory including overseas. In June 2004, the French syndromic surveillance system has been implemented by Santé publique France, the French Public Health Agency. The system collects morbidity data from the emergency department network named OSCOUR and from the emergency associations of general practitioners, SOS Médecins, whose members perform home visits.

May 21, 2019

UPDATED: Syndromic Surveillance 101 - An Introductory Course in Syndromic Surveillance

An Online Training Course

Ever wonder what syndromic surveillance is? How it is applied? This introduction to syndromic surveillance answers your questions and gives you a foundation for understanding how surveillance is used by public health professionals to understand health threats.

 

This video introduces the viewer to the basics of syndromic surveillance and offers a high-level overview of the many uses of this public health tool. Topics covered in this training include:

November 29, 2018

Justification for Collecting Urgent Care Data to Broaden Syndromic Surveillance

While UC does not have a standard definition, it can generally be described as the delivery of ambulatory medical care outside of a hospital emergency department (ED) on a walk-in basis, without a scheduled appointment, available at extended hours, and providing an array of services comparable to typical primary care offices. UC facilities represent a growing sector of the United States healthcare industry, doubling in size between 2008 and 2011. The Urgent Care Association of America (UCAOA) estimates that UC facilities had 160 million patient encounters in 2013.

January 19, 2018

Comparison of National and Local Syndromic Surveillance Data - Cook County, IL, 2017

In 2005, the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) began using the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE) as an emergency department (ED)-based local syndromic surveillance program (LSSP); 23 (100%) of 23 hospitals in suburban Cook County report to the LSSP. Data are transmitted in delimited ASCII text files (i.e., flat files) and contain a unique patient identifier, visit date and time, zip code, age, sex, and chief complaint. Discharge diagnosis and disposition are optional data elements.

January 21, 2018

Evaluation of Syndromic Surveillance in Detecting Hepatitis A in Los Angeles County

In early 2017, HAV outbreaks were identified in San Diego County (490 cases) and Santa Cruz County (73 cases) in California, affecting primarily the homeless and/or illicit drug users. As of October 10, 2017, LAC had identified 12 outbreak-related HAV cases. Due to LAC’s proximity to San Diego County, and its own large homeless population, the syndromic surveillance team of the LAC Department of Public Health created a syndrome category and began querying its ED data to monitor for any increase in HAV-related visits.

Objective:

January 25, 2018

Monitoring Out-of-State Patients during a 2017 Hurricane Response using ESSENCE

Syndromic surveillance is the monitoring of symptom combinations (i.e., syndromes) or other indicators within a population to inform public health actions. The Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) collects emergency department (ED) data from more than 70 hospitals across Tennessee to support statewide syndromic surveillance activities. Hospitals in Tennessee typically provide data within 48 hours of a patient encounter.

January 19, 2018

Correlation of Tweets Mentioning Influenza Illness and Traditional Surveillance Data

The use of social media as a syndromic sentinel for diseases is an emerging field of growing relevance as the public begins to share more online, particularly in the area of influenza. Several applications have been developed to predict or monitor influenza activity using publicly posted or self-reported online data; however, few have prioritized accuracy at the local level. In 2016, the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) collected localized Twitter information to evaluate its utility as a potential influenza sentinel data source.

January 21, 2018

What value can Google search data add to existing syndromic surveillance systems?

Globally, there have been various studies assessing trends in Google search terms in the context of public health surveillance1. However, there has been a predominant focus on individual health outcomes such as influenza, with limited evidence on the added value and practical impact on public health action for a range of diseases and conditions routinely monitored by existing surveillance programmes. A proposed advantage is improved timeliness relative to established surveillance systems.

January 25, 2018

Effect of the Work Week on Demographics of Heat-Related Illness Patients in Syndromic Surveillance

As global temperatures increase, so too does interest in the effect of climate change on the population’s health. 2016 represented the hottest year on record globally and well above the 20th century average in Virginia. With large-scale climate change comes an increase in severe weather patterns, including heat waves. Heat waves can have immense health impacts on a community, including heat stroke, heat exhaustion, and dehydration.

January 25, 2018

Use of Diagnosis Code in Mental Health Syndrome Definition

Between 2006 and 2013, the rate of emergency department (ED) visits related to mental and substance use disorders increased substantially. This increase was higher for mental disorders visits (55 percent for depression, anxiety or stress reactions and 52 percent for psychoses or bipolar disorders) than for substance use disorders (37 percent) visits. This increasing number of ED visits by patients with mental disorders indicates a growing burden on the health-care delivery system.

January 19, 2018

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This Knowledge Repository is made possible through the activities of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cooperative Agreement/Grant #1 NU500E000098-01, National Surveillance Program Community of Practice (NSSP-CoP): Strengthening Health Surveillance Capabilities Nationwide, which is in the interest of public health.

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