Zika Virus Speed and Direction: Reconstructing Zika Introduction in Brazil

Local transmission of Zika virus has been confirmed in 67 countries worldwide and in 46 countries or territories in the Americas. On February 1, 2016 the World Health Organization declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern due to the increase in microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders reported in Brazil. Several countries issued travel warnings for pregnant women travelling to Zika-affected countries with Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and El Salvador advising against pregnancy.

Pregnant women with suspected Zika virus infection: A claims data analysis

Zika virus disease and Zika virus congenital infection are nationally notifiable conditions that became prominent recently as a growing number of travel-associated infections have been identified in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have dedicated significant time and effort on determining and addressing the risks and impact of Zika on pregnant women and their babies who are most vulnerable to the disease.

Monitoring for Local Transmission of Zika Virus using Emergency Department Data

The first travel-associated cases of Zika virus infection in New York City (NYC) were identified in January 2016. Local transmission of Zika virus from imported cases is possible due to presence of Aedes albopictus mosquitos. Timely detection of local Zika virus transmission could inform public health interventions and mitigate additional spread of illness. Daily emergency department (ED) visit surveillance to detect individual cases and spatio-temporal clusters of locally-acquired Zika virus disease was initiated in June 2016. 

Objective

Kidenga: Public engagement for detection and prevention of Aedes -borne viral diseases

Zika, chikungunya, and dengue have surged in the Americas over the past several years and pose serious health threats in regions of the U.S. where Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquito vectors occur. Ae. aegypti have been detected up to 6 months of the year or longer in parts of Arizona, Florida, and Texas where mosquito surveillance is regularly conducted. However, many areas in the U.S. lack basic data on vector presence or absence.

Georgia’s Rapid Expansion of Mosquito Surveillance in Response to Zika Virus

Zika virus was declared an international public health emergency by the World Health Organization on February 1, 2016. With Georgia hosting the world’s busiest international airport and a sub- tropical climate that can support the primary Zika virus vector, Aedes aegypti, and secondary vector, Aedes albopictus, the CDC designated Georgia as a high risk state for vector transmission. Faced with a lack of mosquito surveillance data to evaluate risk of autochthonous transmission and a few counties statewide that provide comprehensive mosquito control, the DPH rapidly scaled up a response.

Primer: Emergency Legal Preparedness Concerning Zika Virus

This Primer, developed by the Network for Public Health Law and posted on June 5, 2017, outlines major public health concerns underlying Zika virus and discusses legal preparedness and response issues. These include legal issues related to testing and screening, surveillance and reporting, public health preparedness, mosquito abatement, liability and insurance, and maternal and child health. 

A Syndrome Definition Validation Approach for Zika Virus

In 2016, the World Health Organization declared Zika virus a global public health emergency. Zika infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly and other fetal brain defects. To facilitate clinicians’ ability to detect Zika, various syndrome definitions have been developed. 

Objective

To develop and validate a Zika virus disease syndrome definition within the GUARDIAN (Geographic Utilization of Artificial Intelligence in Real-Time for Disease Identification and Alert Notification) surveillance system.

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This Knowledge Repository is made possible through the activities of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cooperative Agreement/Grant #1 NU500E000098-01, National Surveillance Program Community of Practice (NSSP-CoP): Strengthening Health Surveillance Capabilities Nationwide, which is in the interest of public health.